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Curated Journal Articles on Mesothelioma

Abdominal Wall Morbidity Following Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy

Scandinavian Journal of Surgery 2017 March [Epub ahead of print] [Link]

Struller F, Koenigsrainer I, Horvath P, Koenigsrainer A, Beckert S

Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Incisional hernia formation has been reported as high as 20% within 1 year following midline laparotomy. Since hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy is likely to impair wound healing, we sought to investigate the incidence of incisional hernia formation and abdominal wall rupture following cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy.
METHODS:
Consecutive patients with radiographic evidence of peritoneal metastases were scheduled for cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy at the Comprehensive Cancer Center, University Hospital Tuebingen, Germany. Clinical data were retrospectively analyzed.
RESULTS:
Between May 2005 and May 2014, 271 patients underwent cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Within follow-up, 19 (7%) incisional hernias and 11 (4%) abdominal wall ruptures were observed. Age ⩾70 years, cardio-pulmonary comorbidity, the presence of pseudomyxoma peritonei or mesothelioma, and postoperative abdominal wall rupture were detected as risk factors for hernia formation. However, Cox multivariate analysis only confirmed the presence of pseudomyxoma peritonei or mesothelioma and postoperative abdominal wall rupture as independent risk factors.
CONCLUSION:
Our data do not suggest that cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy is necessarily associated with a higher incidence of incisional hernia formation. However, patients suffering from pseudomyxoma peritonei or mesothelioma and patients with postoperative abdominal wall rupture seem to be at risk for developing incisional herniation.

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